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How Geothermal Heating Works

One thing that you’ve probably noticed, if you’ve found yourself in the market for a new home heating system, is the fact that there are a lot of different heating options out there from which you may choose your new system. While variety may be the spice of life, the sheer number of heaters available can actually make the prospect of choosing the right one for your needs a bit daunting. That’s okay, though. Just give the professionals on our staff a call, and we’ll help you to find the right heater for your needs. One option well worth your consideration is a geothermal system in Everett, WA. Contact G & S Heating Cooling & Electric today to learn more.

How Does Geothermal Heating Work?

A geothermal heating system shares much in common with a heat pump. In fact, a geothermal system utilizes a heat pump in its operation. The difference is that the heat pump in a geothermal system does not exchange heat with the air surrounding it, the way that an air source heat pump does. Instead, a geothermal loop system is buried in the earth. This loop contains an antifreeze solution, which circulates through the system and absorbs heat directly from the ground. Once it has gathered heat, the solution exchanges that heat with the refrigerant in the heat pump. There, the refrigerant is further compressed, and the resulting heat is used to heat air for the distribution throughout the house. This process is simply repeated until the desired temperature is met and maintained.

Benefits of Geothermal Heating

There are a few ways in which geothermal heating can benefit homeowners. These systems are incredibly efficient, as they make use of existing heat in their operation. Plus, you won’t have to worry about your heat pump struggling to keep up with your heating demand in the event that air temperatures really plummet, as the temperature beneath the ground is fairly constant. That’s not generally much of a concern in the Pacific Northwest, but it is an extra security that many homeowners appreciate. Plus, geothermal systems can double as air conditioners in the summer months.

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