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What Are My Geothermal Installation Options?

While geothermal installation may involve quite a bit of digging, the benefits are undeniable. Geothermal heating and cooling systems provide homeowners with the same powerful heating and cooling power of a conventional split system heat pump, but with a lot of money in additional energy savings. That’s because so little energy is used to pump the relatively stable heat from the ground and into your home, or from your home and back to the earth. You’ll use fewer of the earth’s precious resources as geothermal energy is a renewable power source.

Is Geothermal Installation Right for Me?

If there is enough space on the property and a complete duct system in the home, nearly any homeowner can schedule geothermal installation for better energy-efficiency and prolonged HVAC system lifespan. Geothermal units often need fewer repairs and last many years longer than other heating and cooling systems.

How Much Digging Will Take Place?

Many homeowners are most worried about what will happen to their home during geothermal installation. The installation steps that take place inside of the home and directly outside are similar to the traditional AC installation process, though there are a couple of options. In some cases, every component, including the compressor and blower fan, is in a single cabinet. Or you can install a split-system with an indoor coil and an outdoor compressor unit in order to make use of an existing furnace blower.

But the amount of digging that takes place will vary from property to property. There are two basic options for installation: a vertical layout or a horizontal one. Whether you choose vertical or geothermal installation, installing the underground loop system will be an extensive process. However, replacement should not become necessary for decades, and the economic benefits are often well worth it.

Horizontal vs. Vertical Installation: Which Is Better?

One installation method involves digging a trench of only about 4-6 feet and laying the loop system down horizontally. This will take up a lot of space, but it’s generally more cost-effective, and comes highly recommended. For areas where horizontal installation is not possible, vertical installation is recommended instead.

Call on the help of the experts at G&S Heating, Cooling & Electrical, Inc. to learn more about your geothermal installation options in Monroe and to schedule professional services.

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