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What Are My Geothermal Loop Options?

Using a geothermal heating and cooling system can benefit homeowners in a number of ways. These systems are able to heat homes very efficiently and reliably, as they pull heat from the ground, where temperatures are quite constant when compared to those of the air. They are also able to reverse their operation in order to double as cooling systems during the hottest time of the year. They do so by absorbing heat from the air in a house, and then dumping that heat into the ground. In order to function, a geothermal system requires a geothermal loop to be installed on one’s property. Learn more about this part of the system in the following post. 

Closed Loop Geothermal Systems

When it comes to a geothermal heating and cooling system, most homeowners opt for a closed loop system. There are a few different types of closed loop systems to choose from, though. Ultimately, the layout and characteristics of your property are going to inform the design decisions of your geothermal system.

The horizontal closed loop system is the most common type of geothermal installation, with the necessary pipes being installed in fairly shallow trenches excavated on one’s property. If you do not have much property surrounding your home, the Slinky method of looping these pipes can help to save space. If even this is not enough for your property to accommodate the installation, then a vertical installation may be utilized. This will require that deep holes be drilled, anywhere from 100 to 400 feet deep, into which the pipes are installed. Finally, there is a the pond or lake installation to consider, in which the loop is installed right in the body of water. It must be of certain dimensions and meet various criteria to make this installation possible, of course.

Open Loop Systems

The open loop system is one that does not use an antifreeze mixture or refrigerant in its operation. Instead, water is used as the heat transfer fluid. Once the heat transfer cycle is complete, the water is just dumped back into the source.

Count on G & S Heating Cooling & Electric to ensure that your geothermal installation in Everett, WA is a complete success.

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