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Proudly Serving the Puget Sound Area Since 1977

Choosing the Right Heat Pump for Your Home

If you are in the market for a new HVAC system, but you are not familiar with heat pumps, then you should definitely do a bit of homework before deciding upon what type of system you’ll use in order to keep your home comfortable throughout the year. When you opt to do so with a heat pump, after all, you can use just one system all year long, heating and cooling your home with the very same equipment. Just remember that there are different heat pumps available, and that you should always explore all of your options before making any decisions regarding the purchase of a heat pump in Everett, WA. Read on, and feel free to contact G & S Heating Cooling & Electric with any questions that you may have. 

Air-Source Heat Pumps

An air source heat pump draws heat from the air outside in order to heat one’s home. This heat warms refrigerant, and that refrigerant is then compressed in order to maximize its thermal energy. The resulting heat is then used to heat air that is distributed throughout the house via air ducts. During the summer, the system removes heat from the air indoors, venting it outside, just like an air conditioner.

Ductless Mini Splits

Ductless mini split systems are outstanding options for homeowners looking to utilize heat pump technology in their homes, but without the use of air ducts. While the outdoor compressor of such systems shares much in common with traditional split heat pumps, ductless mini splits use individual, wall-mounted blowers installed throughout the house to facilitate the distribution of heated—or cooled—air. They have refrigerant lines running to them, and act as heat exchangers and blowers themselves. They can be set independently of one another to maintain different temperatures throughout the house.

Ground-Source (Geothermal) Heat Pumps

We don’t really deal with extreme cold in this part of the country, but it is true that very cold temperatures can prove to be too much for air-source heat pumps. A geothermal heat pump, on the other hand, is well-equipped for operation during even the coldest nights of winter. They draw heat from the ground, using an antifreeze solution in a geothermal loop to do so. This heat is exchanged with the refrigerant in the heat pump itself, and is used to heat air for warming your home. In the summer, heat from the house is simply sunk into the ground.

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