G & S Heating Cooling & Electric Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Furnace Repair’

F is for Fall … and Furnace Repairs!

Monday, November 4th, 2019

If you are the proud owner of a furnace, then you know how truly great these systems are–they are efficient, effective, and reliable. But unfortunately, no matter how well your furnace runs, eventually it is going to require repairs (but, that’s why we are here).

There are a number of signs that suggest it’s time to call for furnace repairs, and below, we have outlined some of them for you. Remember to schedule your furnace repair in Marysville, WA with our team if you notice any indications of a furnace that needs our professional attention.

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I’m So Confused! Does My Furnace Need Repairs, Replacement, Or Maintenance?

Monday, October 21st, 2019

For many homeowners, getting their furnaces ready for fall can be a bit confusing–and for good reason! You want to make sure your system is fully equipped to handle those chilly autumn temperatures. So what can you do?

There are so many different types of services that HVAC companies like ours offer that it can be a little tricky to figure out exactly what your system needs. To help you out a bit, we have provided a quick guide below to the types of services your furnace may need and when. Remember to schedule your furnace services in Marysville, WA with our team.

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Boost Your Furnace Efficiency with Zone Control

Monday, February 25th, 2019

Yes, it is only February, which means that we still have a couple of months of cold, rainy weather before we can even think about enjoying the warm, summer sun. Of course, this means that we can’t retire our furnaces anytime soon. Therefore, there is still plenty of time to think about ways to boost energy efficiency inside our homes. When your home is energy efficient, you’ll spend less time worrying about sky-high utility bills and costly furnace repair in Lynnwood, WA. 

There are many ways to improve the efficiency of your furnace, and this week, we are going to be discussing one of the most effective methods for doing so. By installing a zone control system in your home, you’ll have ultimate control over your heating system, increasing efficiency and reducing monthly spending. Keep reading below to learn more about the benefits of these energy-saving systems. 

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Furnace 101: Repair or Replace?

Monday, January 28th, 2019

cold-man-bundled-upCan’t decide between repairing or replacing your furnace? Well, you’ve come to the right place! Temperatures will not be climbing anytime soon, so you’ll want a furnace that can keep you warm and cozy all season long. A faulty furnace can be a big issue, especially when it comes to your comfort and your budget, so you’ll want to make the decision that won’t jeopardize either.

Of course, the decision to replace or repair your existing furnace is best left to a professional HVAC technician who can thoroughly assess the condition of your system. In the meantime, however, we have provided a quick guide for you. Keep reading below to learn more! 

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Too Big, Too Small, or Just Right?

Monday, January 14th, 2019

furnaceSelecting the right furnace for your home might feel like something out of a children’s tale: you have to find the system that is just right. An oversized or undersized furnace can leave you dealing with a handful of issues, costing you both time and money. The best thing that you can do to avoid furnace repair in Everett, WA is to have your system professionally installed.

One common misconception amongst homeowners is that if the furnace physically fits within the space where it is housed, then it will work just fine. Without consulting with a trained professional, homeowners make decisions based on what will fit rather than what their home’s specific needs are. This usually leads to the purchase of an oversized or undersized unit. Below, we have listed the implications of installing an oversized or undersized furnace, as well as the tell-tale signs that your system might not be a good fit. 

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Why Does My Furnace Smell Like Burning?

Monday, February 8th, 2016

When you heat your home, you don’t want to be smelling a burning odor any more than you would want to while cooking your dinner. Furnaces generate heat via the combustion of fossil fuels or with electric resistance. Regardless of the type of furnace that you use, a burning odor is never a good sign. That is why you should contact a member of our staff the moment that you smell burning when you run your heater. While you should never attempt to repair your furnace on your own, we do think that you should have an idea of why your furnace smells this way. Read on to learn more.

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Signs That Your Furnace May Need Repairs

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Furnaces rank among the most popular of all home heating systems, and it is not hard to understand why. When properly sized and installed, a gas or electric furnace is capable of heating most homes in a very effective and efficient manner. Like any other heating system, though, your furnace may well encounter operational problems of some kind eventually. When it does, it is necessary that you have your system repaired as soon as possible. The longer that you wait to schedule furnace repairs in Everett, WA, the worse off your furnace is likely to be. If you notice any of the warning signs discussed below, schedule service with heating repair technician on the G & S Heating Cooling & Electric team immediately.

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Mountlake Terrace Furnace Repair: Air Flow Problems

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Whenever you notice furnace air flow problems in your Mountlake Terrace home, you can usually do a little troubleshooting and solve the issue on your own. Most air flow problems can be fixed easily and quickly. Here are a few guidelines to get you started, but if you need help or notice other problems with your furnace, call a qualified G & S heating technician.

Furnace Filters:
Checking the furnace filter is the first step you should take when there are any issues with your furnace, but especially with air flow problems. If a filter is dirty enough, the furnace will not come on at all. Ultimately, a clogged or dirty filter restricts the air flow, and this is the source of air flow problems ninety percent of the time.

Supply Registars and Cold Air Returns:
Once you’ve replaced or cleaned the filter, check your cold air returns, which are the vents that draw in the cold air in forced air systems. When a cold air return is blocked  by furniture or other obstructions, they cannot draw in enough air to allow the furnace to put out an adequate amount of hot air. Make sure they are open if nothing is blocking them.

Next, check your supply registers, which are the vents that supply the warm air, and make sure they are open as well. Whenever your heat is on, all of your supply registers should be open. Closing some vents will not increase the air flow in other vents in the house. Closing off one or two in areas where heat is not always needed will not hurt your system; however, when you close too many supply registers, it can cause problems with the ductwork and eventually damage the furnace if the air pressure is not correct.

Clean Your Vents:
You should have a qualified HVAC technician professionally clean your ducts and vents at least once a year, which is another reason it’s important to schedule annual maintenance visits. A professional cleaning is typically part of the yearly heating system inspection. You can help by vacuuming your vents regularly, particularly during the months the heating system is not in use, or at least before you turn it on in the fall. Simply cleaning your vents can help air flow and extend the life of your entire heating system.

If you continue to experience air flow problems, call a certified heating technician at G & S. There could be a more serious issue, or if you have a newer furnace, your original ductwork could be the wrong size for that furnace model.

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Lake Stevens Heating Contractor Guide: How to Fix a Faulty Furnace Blower

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

The blower fan on your furnace is designed to distribute warm air through the ductwork in your Lake Stevens home evenly, ensuring you use all of the energy consumed by your furnace. If the blower doesn’t turn on when the furnace turns on or it continues to run when the furnace is off, it can cost you money and result in cold rooms. Here are some tips on how to fix a faulty furnace blower.

What is the Problem?

First, check to see what the problem is. If your furnace blower remains on all of the time, it may be a thermostat issue. Make sure the fan isn’t set to stay on continuously (a common setting for most air handlers). You should also check the limit control switch to make sure it is working properly. If this is broken, it needs to be replaced which is a relatively simple fix.

If the furnace blower isn’t turning on at all, you may have a belt problem. This can be fixed by you if you have the proper tools. To repair the belt problem, first turn off all electricity to the device. You’ll need to remove the old furnace blower belt, so release the tension in the pulleys before removing the belt.

Installing a new belt is not unlike doing so for your car. Make sure to check the blower or your user manual for proper tension when you install the new belt. Make sure you purchase the right size belt and set it to the right tension. If you cannot or you do not feel comfortable doing so, you should call a professional to inspect and repair the problem for you.

Getting the Blower Back Up and Running

Once your new belt is in place, test the system carefully, starting with the lowest setting (if there are variable settings). If it does not yet work or if something sounds strange, call a technician right away. You don’t want the motor to burn out or something else more substantial to go wrong with your furnace or air handler during the middle of the winter.

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Silvana Heating Contractor Guide: Causes of Delayed Furnace Ignition

Monday, December 5th, 2011

Delayed ignition is usually accompanied by a loud banging or booming sound that resembles a small explosion in your gas appliance. In your Silvana home’s furnace, this can be terrifying and should never be ignored.

What Causes Delayed Ignition

Delayed ignition usually happens when you first turn on your furnace, often after a long delay between use, so usually early in the fall or late in the spring when you don’t necessarily have it on every day of the week.

What happens is moisture builds up over the course of a period of inactivity and begins to corrode the firebox in your furnace. That corrosion builds up to the point that it starts to block the ports that feed gas into the burners. When these ports get blocked, the burners down the line cannot light and when you flip the switch, they won’t light immediately.

Of course, while rust and corrosion are a risk, lint and dust can be equally problematic (and are more common if you don’t have your furnace cleaned properly each fall). Sulfur build up is also a possibility, as it is left behind by burning natural gas. It will appear as a layer of white on the surface of the burners or the pilot light.

When all of this happens and the ports are not cleaned properly, gas will build up in the chamber after it is turned on and, when it finally ignites, create the small boom sound. It doesn’t just sound like an explosion – it is one – and if ignored, it can become incredibly dangerous.

Solving the Problem

Delayed furnace ignition is an easy problem to avoid. All you need to do is have your furnace cleaned properly before turning it on each heating season. A technician will clean the burners and ports and remove any dust, lint, rust or sulfur buildup that might block ignition and cause a delay.

When replacing your furnace, look for a device with corrosion resistant materials. You can learn more about these when it comes time to replace your furnace from a technician. Most importantly, be careful. It may be a small problem now, but if left to build up over time, that small boom can become a much larger one.

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